low vision awareness month | Wet AMD

this post is sponsored by Regeneron

y’all know how much i love to read. every month i head off to my local book club to discuss our monthly book selection. i also host a Facebook group book club with Style, where we invite authors from all genres to chat about their recent releases. that’s at least two books a month that are on my must-read list. so you can imagine vison is near and dear to my heart. good eyesight is what enables me to read every gripping word from the latest thriller, biography, or New York Times bestseller. which is why you’ll get a gentle nudge from me from time-to-time to schedule an annual eye exam with your Ophthalmologist. because good vision starts with healthy eyes. there’s nothing more important for an active lifestyle than our eyesight.

today, i’m pleased to partner with Look to Your Future to discuss Low Vision Awareness Month. once we hit a certain age, we all experienced the words the printed page becoming smaller and smaller. am i right?! but are you familiar with Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration? it’s a retinal disease that affects the central vision and often appears in people as they age. the macula is the part of the retina responsible for sharp central vision. when it’s impaired from an abnormal growth or leakage from blood vessels under the macula, our vision is affected.

symptoms for Wet AMD include:

  • blurriness in the center of your vision
  • blind spots or patches
  • straight lines that look wavy
  • colors that look dull or washed out

risk factors for  Wet AMD include:

  • dry AMD
  • age 50 years or older
  • family history of Wet AMD
  • female gender
  • obesity
  • caucasian
  • smoking

i know i know Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration can be a bit scary to think about. but knowledge is power, and we need to arm ourselves with information about this disease so we can confront it head-on. the good news is there are treatment options that may help protect against vision loss caused by Wet AMD. and Look to Your Future has lots of valuable information and tools available to help understand this condition.

there’s nothing better than hopping in my car the first tuesday of the month with a book in hand to hear the thoughts of my book club buddies. did they love the book as much as me? who was their favorite character? what genre do they love to read the most? if you’re like me no matter what stage of life we find ourselves in, we look forward to the next chapter. not only with our latest book but in our daily life. so don’t forget to visit Look to Your Future to learn more about Wet Age-Related Macular Degeneration. because our eyesight is a precious gift.

a big thank you to Regeneron for this sponsored post. and thank you, lovely readers, for supporting the brands that allow me to bring you fresh ideas.

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3 Comments

  1. Kim Bufalo wrote:

    Hi Beth
    This piece is great on AMD. I work in the low Vision field here in Mobile, AL.
    One challenge we face everyday is awareness. There are many people our there that have no idea the aides and devices that are available to help people.
    Early detection and education are crucial.
    Thanks so much for puttiing this inforamation our there.

    Posted 2.17.20
  2. Suzanne M Smith wrote:

    Good advice. I’m very diligent about eye care, particularly because I take a medicine that affects my eyes. I have exams every six months, and I always breathe a sigh of relief when I come home and hear I’m ok. Macular degeneration has always been scary to me–I hope I never get it, because I’m like you–I’m a voracious reader, and I would really miss that. Liking your hair this length for a change–it looks good. Enjoy your book club!

    Posted 2.17.20
  3. jackie wrote:

    Great post as always. would you consider doing a post on choosing the correct style of frames for different face shapes. It can be so confusing.

    Posted 2.18.20

Comments are closed.